Caps, Corks and Forks: Niagara College students prepare for ultimate wine vs. beer showdown Jan. 25

Wine or beer – which is the preferred beverage to pair with a meal?

On January 25, students from Niagara College’s wine and beer programs will continue their battle for supremacy, while guests enjoy an elegant dinner at the College’s sold-out Caps, Corks and Forks event.

This will mark the 14th round for Caps Corks and Forks – a popular series of dinner events held at NC’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute marked by a playful rivalry between the College’s wine and beer students. Guests savour a five-course meal, prepared by a team of culinary students led by chef Kyle Landry, while sipping two carefully selected beverage pairings to accompany each dish – one chosen by Team Wine and another by Team Beer.

Each dish becomes a battleground in this friendly wine-versus-beer competition and, after a little coaxing by members of both teams who address the crowd to defend their selections, guests vote for their preferred beverage following each course – with either a cap or a cork. The team with the most votes is declared the winner at the end of the event.

This round of Caps, Corks and Forks will also shine the spotlight on students from the College’s Artisan Distilling program. At a pre-dinner reception, guests will have an opportunity to sample the top five student-created signature cocktails, selected at a class competition last fall.

“Caps, Corks and Forks showcases applied learning in action for our wine, beer, culinary and distilling students, and is an opportunity for us to bring students from several different programs together for an event like no other,” said Craig Youdale, dean of NC’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute. “Guests get a taste of the world-class education at our Canadian Food and Wine Institute, and have an opportunity to experience the passion our students are developing for their industries first-hand.”

Team Wine is comprised of students in the Winery and Viticulture Technician and Wine Business Management programs, while Team Beer is comprised of students in the Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management program.

First-year Winery and Viticulture Technician student Kate Baginski, who dreams of opening a micro winery someday, values the learning experience she is gaining as a member of Team Wine, led by College winemaker Gavin Robertson.

“Team Wine met many times discussing the menu and styles we believed would work well with each dish. Some were wonderful and some were an absolute no,” said Baginski who is originally from Collingwood, Ontario and developed a passion for wine while living in British Columbia’s Okanagan wine region. “It has helped me to develop a better understanding of what varietals pair well with certain foods, but also how greatly the style of the winemaker can influence the wine with food.”

Second-year Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management student Alex Benjamin said that being a member of Team Beer, led by Brewmaster support liaison Victor North, has been educational and enjoyable. Through brainstorming and tasting sessions with his classmates to select the right beer for a dish, new memories were created.

“This event has been a unique experience by really putting our food and beer pairing knowledge to the test,” said the Dealtown, Ontario native who now lives in St. Catharines. “This was 100 percent a team effort where we all agreed on which individual beer we would pair with each dish. We came together as a team and put out five beers to win.”

Caps Corks and Forks has been a highly anticipated and quick to sell-out event since it launched at NC’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute in 2012. Team Wine has won seven previous Caps, Corks and Forks events while Team Beer has six previous wins.

The January 25 event will be held at Benchmark Restaurant at the College’s Daniel J. Patterson Campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Students from the Broadcasting – Radio, Television and Film program are also zooming in on the action, giving guests in the dining room a behind-the-scenes view of what is happening in the kitchen via a live stream.

Niagara College’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute provides students with valuable hands-on experience and academics in food, innovation, wine and beer. The CFWI, located at the Daniel J. Patterson Campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake, is home to Canada’s first Teaching Winery, Teaching Brewery and Teaching Distillery and its renowned teaching restaurant, Benchmark.

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca

 

-30 –

Media inquiries, please contact:

 

Julie Greco

Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328-2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Michael Wales

Communications Manager

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7773

Cell: 905 328-4101

mwales@niagaracollege.ca

‘ARMMed’ and dangerless: Niagara company rolls out innovative device for aging population

The aging population has a new made-in-Niagara solution to help regain their freedom of movement, thanks to a new device created by a local company with help from Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division.

Niagara Falls-based start-up Bisep Inc. is kicking off the new year by rolling out the full-scale commercialization of a new device that helps connect a person’s wheelchair to their walker, enabling unaided movement – solving a common challenge in long-term care. Named the ARMM (Ambulation, Retraining, Mobility, and Mechanism), the device acts as a security bridge to allow users to walk unassisted with their walker while the wheelchair trails safely behind them.

They plan to manufacture 1,000 units at Spark Niagara, a small manufacturing facility in Niagara Falls which, in turn, supports the creation of jobs and economy in the Niagara region.

The device was the brainchild of Bisep Inc. CEO and founder Daniel Bordenave, who identified the need, came up with the concept and turned to NC’s engineering research team for assistance in getting its innovative medical technology to market.

“We were limited in the machinery that we had and the brain capacity … we are not engineers,” said Bordenave. “What attracted me to Niagara College was the ability to access the amazing innovation department, a national leading group of engineers, and essentially create a quality product that would be functional, user-friendly, and safe.”

“This project is an example of applied research at its best, providing learning opportunities for our students as we help businesses innovate,” said Marc Nantel, NC’s vice president of Research, Innovation and Strategic Initiatives. “We are proud to use our expertise at our Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre to provide solutions for a Niagara-based company that will assist the aging population in our community and beyond.”

Members of the ARMM project research team gather at NC’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre including Allan Spence, PhD (researcher and industry liaison), Yodha Singh (Mechanical Engineering Technology student and research assistant), Dave McKechnie (research laboratory technologist); Daniel Bordenave, (Bisep CEO and founder); and Avery Edge (Mechanical Engineering Technology student and research assistant).

Bordenave recognized the need for such a device while working as a kinesiologist in a long-term care facility. While it is standard practice for two or more health-care practitioners to help one patient with mobility training – one or two helping the individual walk, while another walks behind with the wheelchair in case of falls – funding was only available for a second therapist twice a week.

“Patients weren’t walking on a daily basis, and I couldn’t keep up due to safety concerns and regulations,” he said. “These folks were spending more sedentary time in their beds, in their wheelchairs and not improving, or causing further muscle loss because they were just not walking.”

Bordenave came up with the concept of attaching the wheelchair to the walker. After formulating his idea, he enlisted the tool and die talents of his grandfather to help fabricate a proof-of-concept prototype in their garage. To get it to market, he sought help from the engineering team at NC’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre, based at the Welland Campus. NC’s R&I engineering team executed two projects to get to the final prototype, with funding from the Niagara Region and the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation (SONAMI).

First, the College research team capitalized on its mechanical design software and rapid prototyping technologies to create an initial prototype that would be ready for real-world testing, while Bisep put it into use in a medical research environment. Bisep conducted successful clinical trials through a collaborative research project with the Niagara Region and Brock University.

In addition to having a NC Occupational Therapist Assistant and Physiotherapist Assistant student assist Bisep on a co-op placement, professor Jodi Steele, from the College’s School of Justice and Fitness, leveraged her contacts to help the company secure live focus groups with therapists. Bordenave brought the ARMM to hospitals and long-term care facilities for focus groups with more than 100 therapists.

Bisep returned to NC for design modifications to produce a product that was universal to most wheelchairs and walkers, and adjustable to accommodate varying heights of users. The team replaced welded parts with 3D-printed components to increase the degree of variability in adjusting the device. Another major modification to the design was an exercise mode function – which involves standing from a seated position, a critical ability for mobility and fall prevention.

NC Mechanical Engineering Technology student Avery Edge valued the opportunity to work on the second phase of the project as a research assistant with WAMIC. “I have learned a lot about material strengths and properties, and how they affect the strength and performance of a device,” said Edge. “Being able to work with all technologies on this project also made it so enjoyable … going from computer CAD software to 3D printing to manual metal working for prototypes allowed me to experience what it takes all around to make a great device.”

Bisep has received several accolades for its new device. During the summer of 2019, Bisep placed first in a competition for start-up companies whose innovation in technologies or services can benefit older adults and caregivers. Bordenave was crowned the winner for Ontario in a National Impact Challenge: Startup Edition, AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life NCE Inc.). He was among five finalists to pitch their technology-based solution in one of three regional events in Canada. Bisep was also selected to work with XLerate Health, the largest health-care accelerator in the United States, to help them tap into the U.S. market, doing demonstrations at various health-care facilities.

Bordenave credited student and staff expertise at NC with helping to bring his concept to fruition. “I wouldn’t have been able to do any of this without the help of Niagara College’s Research & Innovation department,” says Bordenave. “If it weren’t for them, I probably would not have the company now or would not have done anything. Having access to funding and the research expertise was beyond amazing.”

Named Canada’s number one Research College by Research Infosource Inc, (view Nov. 12, 2019 news release here) Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division conducts research projects with industry partners through its Agriculture & Environment Innovation Centre, and the Canadian Food & Wine Institute Innovation Centre and the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre. The division also offers support in the areas of digital media and web solutions and business and commercialization solutions. Visit ncinnovation.ca/

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

-30-

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

Julie Greco

Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328-2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Michael Wales

Communications Manager

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7773

Cell: 905 328-4101

mwales@niagaracollege.ca

 

‘ARMMed’ and dangerless: Niagara company rolls out innovative device for aging population

The aging population has a new made-in-Niagara solution to help regain their freedom of movement, thanks to a new device created by a local company with help from Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division.

Niagara Falls-based start-up Bisep Inc. is kicking off the new year by rolling out the full-scale commercialization of a new device that helps connect a person’s wheelchair to their walker, enabling unaided movement – solving a common challenge in long-term care. Named the ARMM (Ambulation, Retraining, Mobility, and Mechanism), the device acts as a security bridge to allow users to walk unassisted with their walker while the wheelchair trails safely behind them.

They plan to manufacture 1,000 units at Spark Niagara, a small manufacturing facility in Niagara Falls which, in turn, supports the creation of jobs and economy in the Niagara region.

The device was the brainchild of Bisep Inc. CEO and founder Daniel Bordenave, who identified the need, came up with the concept and turned to NC’s engineering research team for assistance in getting its innovative medical technology to market.

“We were limited in the machinery that we had and the brain capacity … we are not engineers,” said Bordenave. “What attracted me to Niagara College was the ability to access the amazing innovation department, a national leading group of engineers, and essentially create a quality product that would be functional, user-friendly, and safe.”

“This project is an example of applied research at its best, providing learning opportunities for our students as we help businesses innovate,” said Marc Nantel, NC’s vice president of Research, Innovation and Strategic Initiatives. “We are proud to use our expertise at our Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre to provide solutions for a Niagara-based company that will assist the aging population in our community and beyond.”

Members of the ARMM project research team gather at NC’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre including Allan Spence, PhD (researcher and industry liaison), Yodha Singh (Mechanical Engineering Technology student and research assistant), Dave McKechnie (research laboratory technologist); Daniel Bordenave, (Bisep CEO and founder); and Avery Edge (Mechanical Engineering Technology student and research assistant).

Bordenave recognized the need for such a device while working as a kinesiologist in a long-term care facility. While it is standard practice for two or more health-care practitioners to help one patient with mobility training – one or two helping the individual walk, while another walks behind with the wheelchair in case of falls – funding was only available for a second therapist twice a week.

“Patients weren’t walking on a daily basis, and I couldn’t keep up due to safety concerns and regulations,” he said. “These folks were spending more sedentary time in their beds, in their wheelchairs and not improving, or causing further muscle loss because they were just not walking.”

Bordenave came up with the concept of attaching the wheelchair to the walker. After formulating his idea, he enlisted the tool and die talents of his grandfather to help fabricate a proof-of-concept prototype in their garage. To get it to market, he sought help from the engineering team at NC’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre, based at the Welland Campus. NC’s R&I engineering team executed two projects to get to the final prototype, with funding from the Niagara Region and the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation (SONAMI).

First, the College research team capitalized on its mechanical design software and rapid prototyping technologies to create an initial prototype that would be ready for real-world testing, while Bisep put it into use in a medical research environment. Bisep conducted successful clinical trials through a collaborative research project with the Niagara Region and Brock University.

In addition to having a NC Occupational Therapist Assistant and Physiotherapist Assistant student assist Bisep on a co-op placement, professor Jodi Steele, from the College’s School of Justice and Fitness, leveraged her contacts to help the company secure live focus groups with therapists. Bordenave brought the ARMM to hospitals and long-term care facilities for focus groups with more than 100 therapists.

Bisep returned to NC for design modifications to produce a product that was universal to most wheelchairs and walkers, and adjustable to accommodate varying heights of users. The team replaced welded parts with 3D-printed components to increase the degree of variability in adjusting the device. Another major modification to the design was an exercise mode function – which involves standing from a seated position, a critical ability for mobility and fall prevention.

NC Mechanical Engineering Technology student Avery Edge valued the opportunity to work on the second phase of the project as a research assistant with WAMIC. “I have learned a lot about material strengths and properties, and how they affect the strength and performance of a device,” said Edge. “Being able to work with all technologies on this project also made it so enjoyable … going from computer CAD software to 3D printing to manual metal working for prototypes allowed me to experience what it takes all around to make a great device.”

Bisep has received several accolades for its new device. During the summer of 2019, Bisep placed first in a competition for start-up companies whose innovation in technologies or services can benefit older adults and caregivers. Bordenave was crowned the winner for Ontario in a National Impact Challenge: Startup Edition, AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life NCE Inc.). He was among five finalists to pitch their technology-based solution in one of three regional events in Canada. Bisep was also selected to work with XLerate Health, the largest health-care accelerator in the United States, to help them tap into the U.S. market, doing demonstrations at various health-care facilities.

Bordenave credited student and staff expertise at NC with helping to bring his concept to fruition. “I wouldn’t have been able to do any of this without the help of Niagara College’s Research & Innovation department,” says Bordenave. “If it weren’t for them, I probably would not have the company now or would not have done anything. Having access to funding and the research expertise was beyond amazing.”

Named Canada’s number one Research College by Research Infosource Inc, (view Nov. 12, 2019 news release here) Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division conducts research projects with industry partners through its Agriculture & Environment Innovation Centre, and the Canadian Food & Wine Institute Innovation Centre and the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre. The division also offers support in the areas of digital media and web solutions and business and commercialization solutions. Visit ncinnovation.ca/

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

-30-

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

Julie Greco

Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328-2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Michael Wales

Communications Manager

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7773

Cell: 905 328-4101

mwales@niagaracollege.ca

 

Sean Kennedy selected as Niagara College’s sixth President

The Niagara College Board of Governors announced today that it has selected Sean Kennedy, an experienced postsecondary leader with 20 years of experience leading teams in several areas of higher education, as Niagara College’s sixth president.

Currently Niagara College’s senior vice president, International, Kennedy has been a part of the College’s senior leadership team since 2006.

“Sean is student-focused, and embodies the Niagara College DNA – the welcoming, passionate and trailblazing qualities that set Niagara College apart and form the foundation of its success,” said John F.T. Scott, chair of the Niagara College Board of Governors.

Kennedy succeeds Dan Patterson, who announced in spring, 2019 that he would conclude his 25-year tenure as president. In July 2019, the Niagara College Board of Governors began its process to select a new president.

“Our recruitment process attracted exceptional candidates from across the country,” said Scott. “In the end it became very clear that Sean brings the ideal combination of energy, experience, vision and community connections that will help him lead Niagara College into the next chapter of its remarkable history.”

Kennedy joined Niagara College in 2006 as vice president, Student and External Relations and CEO of the Niagara College Foundation, a role in which he oversaw the College’s re-branding and implemented strategies to strengthen the College’s marketing, fundraising, enrolment, community engagement and government relations.

For the 2011-2012 academic year, Kennedy served as interim vice president, Academic, with responsibility for all academic operations of the College, including program quality, pathways and educational development.

Kennedy assumed his current role in 2014, overseeing the College’s global engagement and rapidly growing international activities, including international partnerships and student mobility, student recruitment and services, English Language programs, and overseas projects, campuses and training. In this role, Kennedy has led a multi-national team of more than 500 employees who have significantly extended the College’s profile and enriched the lives of students around the world.

Kennedy has also been a member of boards and agencies at the national, provincial and community levels.

Prior to joining Niagara College, Kennedy held leadership positions in student services, academic and International education at the University of Alberta and Red Deer College.

“It is an absolute privilege to be given the opportunity to lead Canada’s most dynamic college,” said Kennedy.  “Niagara College is successful because we dream big, we dare to lead, and we have an exceptionally dedicated team of faculty and staff, who share a commitment to the success of our students and our communities. Looking ahead to a period of significant opportunities and challenges, I will work tirelessly as president to nurture, encourage and leverage our shared values, and the defining characteristics that set Niagara College apart.”

Kennedy and his wife, Kerry, live in Fonthill and are the proud parents of two sons, Aidan and Neil.

-30-

Note to editors: For interviews, please contact Michael Wales, manager, Corporate Communications at 905 328-4101 or mwales@niagaracollege.ca.

Media inquiries, contact:

Michael Wales
Manager, Corporate Communications
905 735-2211 ext. 7773
905 328-4101 (cell)
mwales@niagaracollege.ca

 

About Sean T. Kennedy

A strong advocate for the value of applied education – in Ontario, Canada and around the world – Sean Kennedy is an experienced postsecondary leader with 20 years of experience leading teams in all areas of higher education.

Appointed Niagara College’s sixth president in January, 2020, Sean has been a member of the College’s senior leadership team since 2006, when he joined NC as vice president of Student and External Relations, a role in which he oversaw the development of the College’s new branding and community engagement strategies and was responsible for Enrolment & Registration, Student Services, Alumni Services, Athletics, Marketing and Recruitment, and International.  In addition, he was the CEO of the Niagara College Foundation, responsible for leading the College’s fundraising efforts.

From September 2011 to June 2012, Sean served as Niagara College’s interim vice president, Academic, with responsibility for all academic operations of the College, including programs, pathways and educational development, research and innovation, and the College’s learning enterprises.

Since 2014, Sean has served as vice president, and currently senior vice president, International, leading the College’s global engagement and rapidly growing international activities, including international partnerships and student mobility, student recruitment and services, English Language programs, and overseas projects, campuses and training.

Prior to joining Niagara College, Sean was dean of students, and then associate vice president, Student Services and International Education at Red Deer College in Alberta. After serving as a student leader with the Students’ Union, Sean held various roles at the University of Alberta from 1990 to 2000, including director of the Student Ombudservice and director, Undergraduate Student Services in the Faculty of Education.

Recognized as a leader in international education and student services in Canada, Sean has served on the board of directors of the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE) and a number of international advisory committees. He has also served as chair of the Colleges Ontario Student Access and Success Coordinating Committee, and as co-moderator of the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Summit on Mental Health and Addictions.

Active in the community, Sean has served on the boards of the Business Education Council of Niagara, Niagara Sport Commission, Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce, St. Catharines-Thorold Chamber of Commerce and Leadership Niagara.

Sean holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Alberta and a Master of Public Administration from Queen’s University, and is currently completing his Doctoral studies in leadership in higher and adult education and comparative, international and development education at the University of Toronto.

A sports and outdoors enthusiast, Sean holds a Level III National Coaching Certification in cross-country skiing. He and his wife, Kerry, live in Fonthill and are the proud parents of two sons, Aidan and Neil.

Niagara College set to give a warm winter welcome to new students this term

Niagara College is ready to welcome over 2,000 new students to begin their studies at the Welland and Niagara-on-the-Lake campuses this month.

Winter term 2020 will kick off with orientation activities on January 3 for new students, followed by the start of classes on January 6.  A variety of orientation activities will continue into January as part of ‘Frost Week’ designed to introduce students to both the academic and social aspects of college life, organized by the Centre for Student Engagement and Leadership (CSEL), the Niagara College Student Administrative Council (NCSAC), Athletics and Recreation, and the International division.

“We’re ready to extend a warm Niagara College welcome to our new students as they embark on an exciting journey into applied learning,” said President Dan Patterson. “Our students come from all over Canada and abroad to study with us, and we’re proud to show them how the college experience at NC is second to none.”

“Orientation lays the foundation for our students’ success by being a positive start to their Niagara College journey,” said Shari Walsh, associate director of Engagement, Advising & Career Services. “Our programming is designed to help students feel comfortable with their programs, checking important items off their to-do list, and connecting with their professors and other students.

“The goal of Orientation is to provide support and information to our new students without it being completely overwhelming.”

On January 3, new students will take part in a variety of engaging programming for a smooth transition to college life, beginning with a welcome at 9:30 a.m. with hot beverages and fruit at both campuses.

Program information sessions kick off the day, offering students the opportunity to find out more about their academic programs, get a head-start on the curriculum and meet faculty and their fellow peers. Sessions will be held at both campuses from 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Co-op information sessions will take place from noon – 12:30 p.m. MyNC help tutorials – to learn how to navigate the college’s portal for grades, fees, admissions and timetables – will be offered at both campuses from noon – 2 p.m.

Students can drop-in to the Checklist fair at the Welland Campus (Learning Commons) and the NOTL Campus (Cafeteria) from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. to learn about the many services available to students on- and off-campus. Student card pick-up will also be available on a drop-in basis at the fair between 11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Events continue throughout Frost Week with a Paint Party Pub Night (Jan. 7 @ 9 p.m. in NOTL), NC Knights varsity basketball games (Jan. 10 in Welland, men’s @ 6 p.m., women’s @ 8 p.m.), Winter Wonderland with a giant inflatable igloo and glowing swings (Jan. 14 from 3 to 8 p.m. in Welland), and the beloved ‘SACafellar Square’ skating rink (Jan. 15 and 16 from 12 to 8 p.m. in NOTL).

In addition to college-wide orientation, the College’s International Division will present International Student Orientation from Jan. 2-4 including, information sessions, fairs and a visit to Niagara Falls.

For Orientation details visit orientation.niagaracollege.ca/schedule.

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

 

-30-

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

Andrew Korchok
Communications Consultant
Office: 905 641 2252 ext. 7430
Cell: 905 329 1642
akorchok@niagaracollege.ca

Julie Greco
Communications Consultant
Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368
Cell: 905 328 2532
jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

RBC Foundation injects funding into NC School of Business for productivity innovation

A corporate gift to Niagara College’s School of Business will enhance opportunities for students while helping small- and medium-sized enterprises increase productivity.

RBC Foundation has announced $150,000 – pledged over a three-year period – to support NC’s Productivity Innovation Lab (PiLab). The gift was funded through RBC’s Future Launch, a 10-year $500-million commitment to help Canadian youth prepare for the jobs of tomorrow.

“We’re excited to be working with Niagara College to help bring RBC Future Launch to life,” said Steve Nixon, regional vice president, Niagara Market, RBC. “We have a responsibility to prepare young people for the opportunities and ambiguities of the future. RBC Future Launch is a decade-long commitment to helping Canadian youth prepare for the jobs of tomorrow.”

“The ability to grow and adapt has improved here in the Niagara region thanks to the RBC Foundation’s significant investment in Niagara College,” said Steve Hudson, senior vice-president, Academic and Learner Services, Niagara College. “RBC’s support is a testament to the unparalleled experiential learning we offer our students, and will open the door to even more opportunities for them to assist SMEs seeking to enhance productivity and innovation.”

Launched in 2013, PiLab offers a framework to help small- and medium-sized businesses achieve sustainable productivity gains while providing valuable experiential opportunities for students within NC’s School of Business and Management Studies. Through PiLab, students assist SMEs with industry research, technology adoption and idea testing to support productivity challenges, business strategy, branding, and innovation.

“Working at PiLab offers students a whole different level of experience,” said Dawit Eshetu, associate dean, School of Business. “While our students have done course-based research before, at PiLab they are elevated to a consultant role as industry solution-seekers.”

Since PiLab was launched in 2013, it has assisted 10 small businesses while it has provided 15 students with work experience, and engaged 75 students from the School of Business and Management Studies.

Eshetu noted that RBC’s gift will boost PiLab’s outreach significantly during the next three years. It is expected to create up to 30 part-time paid positions for students, who will gain experience working directly with clients, and help to create new course curriculum and workshops to expand opportunities for other Business students. About 300 Business students are expected to work on PiLab projects during the next three years, thanks to RBC Foundation’s gift.

Funds will also support students working on PiLab projects through mentorship and seminars focused on research, communication, problem solving, and data analytics, specific to the projects at hand; and will  ensure that faculty are trained in the latest technological advances. Local RBC employees will also participate as guest speakers and mentors for students.

“The partnership with RBC allows us to create more practical learning and networking opportunities that create much-needed workplace skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, digital competencies and teamwork,” said Eshetu. “It also helps us build our capacity to provide additional quality experiential opportunities through projects which involve students directly with industry partners.”

News of RBC Foundation’s gift was applauded by students Adam Sheridan and Stephen Moss who work as student consultants for PiLab while studying in Bachelor of Business Administration (International Commerce and Global Development) program. Currently working on a project for a Toronto-based startup company, Sheridan and Moss are developing a plan to incorporate the project work for their client into a classroom project for second-term students in the International Business Management graduate certificate program. The pilot project will kick off in January and the results will be presented to the client in April.

“Working with PiLab has truly been enriching. It has provided me with hands-on experience working with clients, as well as mentoring, working with other students on projects in almost a managing role, as we liaise with them and our clients,” said Sheridan. “I’m excited that even more students in our program will benefit from this experience through RBC Foundation’s gift.”

“For me, working at PiLab has really opened my eyes to future opportunities,” said Moss, a lifelong Niagara resident. “I have a two-year-old daughter at home now and I want to make her proud.”

Recent industry partner Borgo Contract Seating applauded the assistance it has received through NC’s PiLab. PiLab assisted Borgo with implementing 5S and setting the building blocks for its lean management system. More recently, from 2015-2018, the company also worked with PiLab on a project which focused on researching and understanding the landscape of classrooms of the future.

“Being able to work with young bright minds along with well-informed professionals was the perfect fit,” said Lucas Spassiani, vice-president of Borgo. “Their hands-on approach helped us put in a system that works to meet our specific needs and they have left us with the tools to train future employees, effectively and easily.

“We couldn’t be happier with the outcome and look forwarded to our future projects.”

Niagara College’s School of Business and Management, prepares students for a wide variety of industries spanning from accounting to marketing, human resources, international business, and more. Diploma, certificate and two four-year degree programs are taught by professors with significant expertise in their field and reflect NC’s commitment to providing students with hands-on learning opportunities through internships and placements. Visit niagaracollege.ca/business/.

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

 

PHOTO ABOVE:

Representatives from RBC joined representatives from Niagara College on December 12 to announce RBC’s gift. Pictured from left: David Day, VP, Commercial Financial Services, Niagara Market, RBC; Mark Parker, professor, Niagara College; Adam McInnis, VP, RBC Dominion Securities, Niagara Market; Fiona Allan, associate VP Academic Services, Niagara College; Steve Hudson, senior VP, Academic and Learner Services, Niagara College; Steve Nixon, regional VP, Niagara Market, RBC; Adam Sheridan, Niagara College student and PiLab consultant; Stephen Moss, Niagara College student and PiLab Consultant; and Dawit Eshetu, associate dean, School of Business, Niagara College.

-30-

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

 

Julie Greco

Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328 2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Stock up on holiday gift items at NC and support student learning

It’s easy to embrace the spirit of gift giving this season with so many fabulous finds at Niagara College.

Whether you’re aiming to please the loved ones on your list, or sprucing up your home for the holidays, there are plenty of festive items on campus to choose from.

Shopping on campus isn’t only convenient; the Learning Enterprises offer a variety of unique, made in Niagara products while proceeds from sales support student learning … gifts that keep on giving!

So dash over to these on-campus gift hot spots below to wrap up your holiday shopping!

Greenhouse/ Benchmarket

Decking the halls isn’t complete without beautiful college-grown poinsettias – and they make wonderful gifts too. Look no further than the NC Teaching Greenhouse (NOTL) where they are available in a variety of sizes and colours.

Six-inch red, white, pink and multicolour poinsettias are available for $7.99 each with $1 from each sale donated to the College’s United Way campaign.

Branching out to bigger blooms? Ten-inch beauties pack a punch and are available for $17.99 apiece. Or if tiny blossoms are more your style, opt for four-inch poinsettias for $4.50 or adorable minis for $4.

A visit to the Greenhouse isn’t complete without swinging by Benchmarket. Attached to the Greenhouse – and just steps from the Teaching Brewery – Benchmarket is the perfect go-to for gift seekers. Browse the shelves for an assortment of items that make great gifts and stocking stuffers – from handcrafted soaps and teas to jewellery and other student-made products sure to please.

Visit ncteachinggreenhouse.ca/

Teaching Brewery

Did you know that jolly ol’ Saint Nick is the patron saint of brewers?  Brewmaster Jon Downing his crew at the Teaching Brewery (NOTL) sure do, and they’ve brewed up a fine collection of holiday beers in the spirit of the season.

Rudolph’s Red Nosed Ale has returned to bring its glow to the stormiest of winter nights. Enjoy a 2019 Rudolph’s Red Nosed Ale – a winter warmer brewed with oats, biscuit malt and wheat malt to give a Christmas cookie character. Or opt for the 2018 Rudolph’s Black Nosed Ale, which was aged for a year, to make a very smooth, dark winter brew.

Searching for a piquant pint? The 2019 Spiced Rudolph’s has all the same characters as its red-nosed kin but with added cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice.

Dreaming of Christmas across the pond? Choose a Weihnachtsbier – which means ‘Christmas beer” in German. The 5.5 percent ABV German lager is available in kegs and cans.

Insider’s tip: Weihnachtsbier will also be released on cask exclusively at Silversmith Brewing Company, during the week of Christmas, as part of Silversmith’s weekly cask offerings from the NC Teaching Brewery.

Craft beer lovers on your list will love the multiple-award-winning Butler’s Bitter or popular brews from its Beer 101 series. For those always looking for unique finds, tap into a variety of innovative Small Batch brew selections created by Brewmaster students.

For those who have been extra nice this year, it may be the perfect time to get drafted to the Growler Club. Memberships include a growler filled with specialty brew (pick-up only), tasting notes and recipes for food pairings emailed monthly, exclusive access to specialty brews two weeks prior to their general release, complimentary beer tastings with growler refills, a 25 percent discount on merchandise, discounted or complimentary rates to brewery events, and more. Visit ncteachingbrewery.ca/growlerclub/.

Visit ncteachingbrewery.ca/

Benchmark

Treat the foodies on your list to a dining experience at the award-winning Benchmark restaurant  (NOTL) where they can enjoy food wine and beer prepared and presented by students.

Benchmark gift cards are available in any denomination, so they fit any budget. Stop into the restaurant or call 905-641-2252 ext. 4619.

Benchmark has also teamed up with the Teaching Winery to offer Wine and Dine holiday packages. A $100 package includes a $50 Benchmark Gift Card, two bottles of VQA wine, a $10 Brewery Gift Card, Complimentary Tasting Card. Or upgrade the above package with a $100 Benchmark gift card instead, with all the same extra goodies, for $150.

Visit ncbenchmark.ca/

Wine Visitor + Education Centre

The Wine Visitor + Education Centre (NOTL) is a one-stop shop for wine, spirits and cider made at NC.

Take advantage of a Holiday Wine Sale with 15 percent off all wine purchases until December 31. Browse the shelves for an assortment of wines made by Canada’s first and only commercial teaching winery.

A variety of gift baskets are also available at the WVEC, for less than $50 and less than $100.

For entertainers, Holiday Wine Cases of featured wines are now 20 percent off (must purchase full case).

Cider enthusiasts will love the new Small Batch holiday cider launched by the NC Teaching Winery: Montmorency Cherry Cider. Multiple-award-winning Cider 101 is always a hit with sippers and judges alike – it recently picked up another gold at the U.S. Cider Championship,

Make spirits bright with a bottle from the NC Teaching Distillery. Special Cocktail Gift Packs are available at the WVEC.

Wine lovers will raise a glass to a NC Wine Club membership. Members enjoy carefully selected VQA wines crafted by the Teaching Winery’s professional winemaker Gavin Robertson.  Two bottles are delivered each month, along with wine tasting notes and food accompaniment suggestions with each shipment. Members also receive complimentary tastings at the WVEC Tasting Bar, 25 percent off non-wine merchandise and experiences, invitations to exclusive club member events and early access to wine education seminars. To sign up visit:

niagaracollegewine.ca/index.cfm?method=clubs.JoinClub&clublevelid=fc042adb-a72b-8e38-9bfb-3c44f9859b18

Bonus: free gift-wrapping is also available at the WVEC!

You can’t go wrong with a gift card which can be redeemed for any purchase of wine, beer, cider or spirits at NC’s Teaching Brewery retail store or Wine Visitor + Education Centre.  Cards featuring either wine or beer graphics are available.

Visit or shop online at niagaracollegewine.ca

Teaching Hair Salon

Over at the Welland Campus, giving is always in style at the Teaching Salon, where NC Hairstyling students keep public clientele perfectly coiffed, ready for any celebration.

For those on your list who say ‘yes to the tress,’ hair products can make great gifts or stocking stuffers. A variety of Christmas gift packages are available.

 Visit niagaracollege.ca/employers-community/shop-dine/hair-salon/

 

Silversmith Brewing rolls out weekly cask beer crafted by Niagara College Teaching Brewery

NC Brewmaster student Dan Clark pours a pint of his beer, Loggerhead, from behind the bar at Silversmith as Jon Downing (NC Brewmaster professor), Ben Goerzen (Silversmith marketing and communications), and Ian Evans (NC Brewmaster student) look on.

Real ale’ enthusiasts can now savour the flavours of a new cask-conditioned beer every week at Silversmith Brewing Company, thanks to a new partnership with the Niagara College Teaching Brewery.

Silversmith Brewing Company, a Vigil-based destination brewery popular with Niagara residents and tourists alike, began offering weekly cask beers crafted by students from Niagara College’s Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management program in early November. They plan to feature a new cask beer selection from the NC Teaching Brewery each week, year-round. The cask beers from the NC Teaching Brewery are available exclusively at Silversmith.

The fresh, all-natural cask beers are designed and brewed locally at the College’s Teaching Brewery in Niagara-on-the-Lake by third-semester Brewmaster students – all using hops from NC’s on-campus hop yard. Each Monday, a new cask is delivered to Silversmith to be tapped and ready to enjoy by Tuesday.

“As part of Niagara region’s tourism area for food, wine and drink, we believe it’s important to support Niagara College and its Teaching Brewery – which is the first of only two brewing schools in Canada,” said Ben Goerzen, marketing and communications, Silversmith Brewing Company. “We’re proud that this is the first partnership of its kind in Niagara and we’ve had a great response. Every week, the featured cask beer sells out well before the next one comes in.”

“We thank Silversmith for their tremendous support for beer education at Niagara College through this monumental new partnership,” said Steve Gill, general manager of the College’s Learning Enterprises. “It not only validates the quality of student-created products made on campus at our Teaching Brewery but boosts public exposure for our students and the products they create through their applied learning experience at NC.”

The idea stemmed from NC Brewmaster student Ian Evans who works part-time at Silversmith as a tour guide and server. Passionate about cask beer, Evans approached his employer about the possibility of featuring them more frequently and suggested they offer Niagara College beers.

“They loved the idea,” he said.

Evans’ beer Sherlock’s Cap – a British-style brown ale he created for his third semester Target Brew project – was the first NC cask beer featured at Silversmith in early November. It sold out in three days.

“I’m excited that all term three students will now have a chance to do this. It’s really cool to get feedback from the wide range of people enjoying a pint of it at Silversmith, and from the servers and brewers as well, in addition to my peers at the College,” said Evans. “When I talk to my regulars at Silversmith, they always want to know about the next cask beer that’s coming up.”

On December 3, a west coast-style ale called ‘Loggerhead’ created by third-semester Brewmaster student Dan Clark became the latest to join the lineup of NC featured cask beers at Silversmith.

“I didn’t expect to see a beer that I created available anytime soon at my favourite brewery,” said Clark. “We learned about cask beer in class, but to actually get to do it for a brewery like Silversmith is really cool because it gives us an opportunity to get our beers out there for more people to try.”

Brewmaster professor Jon Downing noted that the prospect of coming up with 52 different casks a year for a local brewery may have seemed daunting when they were first approached by Silversmith about the idea, but it aligned perfectly with what students in the third semester of the program are learning.

As part of their Target Brew project, all 18 third-semester students are required to create a competition-style beer for the Canadian Brewing Awards, brewed according to CBA guidelines. While the Target Brews are typically put into kegs and cans and sold at the Teaching Brewery under its Small Batch Beer label, now most of the 64 Target Brews created each year will also be cask-conditioned for Silversmith – a process which adds sugar and yeast to give the beer natural carbonation and distinct flavour.

“For many of our students, it is the first beer they are designing,” said Downing. “This is a valuable opportunity for them to apply their learning to create cask beers from their Target Brew projects and have them enjoyed by the public.”

While the students have been learning about cask beer in the program, Downing noted that there was little demand for casks when the Teaching Brewery began offering them five years ago, but they seem to be getting more popular.

“Many didn’t have the facilities or the tap, didn’t know how to look after it or didn’t think it could sell fast enough so we stopped,” he said. “Now, there are cask festivals with thousands of people showing up and hundreds of different beers on cask.

“For me, it’s the best style of beer no matter what variety or style. It’s always fresh, always naturally carbonated.”

Goerzen also noted that cask beer has become more popular in recent years – enjoyed by older and younger crowds alike.

“As a consumer, you get to try different beers more often with cask beer and it’s a different way to experience beer,” he said. “As a brewery, cask beers allow us to experiment in a small batch format and it might actually make its way to a new beer in the future.”

Silversmith Brewing Company is located at 1523 Niagara Stone Road, Virgil. For info visit silversmithbrewing.com/.

Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management program was launched in 2010 as the first of its kind in Canada. The award-winning, two-year program offers extensive hands-on training at an on-site, state-of-the-art Teaching Brewery to prepare students for employment in the expanding brewery, microbrewery and brewpub industries. Located at NC’s Daniel J. Patterson Campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake, students learn from award-winning faculty and have access to on-site hop yard and local farm products to brew a full range of beer styles. Visit ncteachingbrewery.ca

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

 

Julie Greco

Niagara College, Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328 2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Benjamin Goerzen

Silversmith Brewing Company, Marketing & Communications

Office: 905 468-8447

Cell: 905 360-1241

ben@silversmithbrewing.com

Niagara College builds empathy into Paramedic program training

Paramedic students (from left) PParamedic students (from left) Shyann Woods, Eric Vangoch and Nathan Wise lend a hand at the Hope Centre food bank. They are pictured with NC clinical supervisor Nate Alaimo (back right) and Hope Centre staff Shannon Munro and Gina Couldery.

A food bank or a community lunch program may not be typical training grounds for aspiring paramedics, but Niagara College has launched a new initiative to do just that for its Paramedic students in an effort to add empathy and other ‘soft’ skills to their tool kits.

From helping with meal prep to stocking food bank shelves, second-year Paramedic students have been working shifts at the Hope Centre in Welland, which serves some of the most vulnerable citizens in the area. The experience has been part of their clinical placement course since September. All 50 students enrolled in the course are required to complete two three-hour shifts at the Hope Centre: one assisting with the community lunch program, and another at the food bank.

In addition to experiences that help to improve their technical or ‘hard skills’ such as ride-outs in ambulances with Niagara Emergency Services, the new initiative aims to help students build ‘soft skills’ like empathy, compassion and communication. It also serves to teach them the value of community service, and help them become more comfortable with clients from vulnerable populations such as those who experience poverty and homelessness, mental illness or addictions.

“This is truly a lesson in humility for our students,” said Community and Health Studies dean Carolyn Triemstra. “Paramedics can be challenged in the field, particularly when working with clients from vulnerable populations. Through this new initiative, our students gain experience with vulnerable populations before they enter the field, while enhancing their ‘soft skills’ that are valuable to being a paramedic.”

Clinical supervisor Nate Alaimo noted that the new initiative was launched as a response to a recent shift in the types of calls paramedics have been responding to.

“While we were typically used to responding to calls at a person’s house, a lot of paramedicine has recently turned to mental health and to the vulnerable populations who don’t have houses, don’t have food, or the options of many of the services we take for granted,” said Alaimo. “By working with some of the more vulnerable populations, our students are learning to be empathetic, be compassionate and really be able to understand the differences in peoples’ lives, and where they’re coming from.”

Niagara EMS system transformation project lead Karen Lutz-Graul, who is also the commander of quality assurance and performance standards, noted the need for such training.

“The addition of this new initiative in paramedic education aligns with the transformative changes occurring within Niagara EMS and across the field of paramedicine as a whole, which are aimed at ensuring all those that we serve are provided care that is holistically able to better treat those in our community who may be vulnerable or have social inequities,” said  Lutz-Graul. “Ensuring that future paramedics have the skills and training to provide this care is crucial to their future careers as paramedics within our community of service providers.”

At the Hope Centre’s Community Lunch program – which serves a hot lunch at noon for to up to 80 people Monday to Friday – students assist with tasks like food preparation, cleaning and serving; while at the food bank – which averages about 30 clients per day – they help stock shelves and assist clients with their grocery lists. When they aren’t needed to complete tasks however, students focus on mingling with clients.

Shannon Munro, fund development and community coordinator at the Hope Centre, said that the students’ contributions have been invaluable – not only as needed extra hands to assist with the delivery of the Centre’s services but in their client interactions.

“It’s a two-way street with what’s learned and gained between our clients and the students,” she said. “There can be a lot of barriers between the vulnerable population and people in uniform, and this is a good opportunity for our clients to become more comfortable with them.”

“Our clients build trust talking to the Paramedic students,” said Gina Couldery, food services coordinator. “They’ve been very interested in the students who have been coming here every week.”

Students noted they value the experience they are gaining. Nathan Wise believes it will improve the kind of paramedic he will be. “To be the best patient advocate, we need to feel like we’re on the same team to better connect with and treat patients,” he said. “I think it’s important for us to knock down those barriers that divide us, like socioeconomic status, and just be able to connect with people.”

Shyann Woods valued the experience of interacting with clients. “It gave me insight into how other people live that I wouldn’t normally have been around,” she said. “Having conversations, asking people who they are and what they’ve done, it was simple – just like having a conversation with a friend.”

Eric Vangoch believes that learning about the process of using a food bank and what it means for clients will help him and his classmates remain judgement-free as paramedics.

“The big thing for me was to gain a sense of what the clients go through on a daily basis and what it takes for them to feed their family – the humility it takes,” he said. “The more we know about our clients and what they go through daily, why they’re in the position they’re in, it gives us a better idea when we’re responding on the road.

“People are in these positions for a reason and that reason may not be in their control, so why would we make a judgement about that, or provide any lesser form of care because of their situation?”

Additional community experience

As part of their clinical placement class, Paramedic students also complete shifts assisting seniors at the South Niagara Health and Wellness Centre (SNHWC) and Community Support Services of Niagara (CSSN).

At CCSN’s Welland, St. Catharines and Niagara Falls locations – all Niagara Regional Housing sites – students assist with a Wellness Supportive Living program. They interact with senior clients/tenants at coffee and breakfast programs, engage in conversations and provide one-on-one attention.

“We are challenged with time and resources to have meaningful one-on-one conversations with all clients while delivering a variety of both congregate dining and social/recreation programs in a group setting,” said CCSN executive director Carolyn Askeland. “The students have allowed CSSN to ensure that those clients with the greatest need are provided with a dedicated individual to listen and engage in conversation. In addition, it has allowed CSSN staff to give attention to our ‘well’ clients who are sometimes overlooked within the busyness of day-to-day operations.”

At the SNHWC, students assist with the wellness component of the Ambulatory Rehab program – geared to helping older adults – and practice their hard and soft skills. They take blood pressure and vitals on clients and work on their communication skills by participating in health education sessions and exercises alongside clients.

“Students are provided opportunities to work among a team, problem solve, and practice different communication strategies, all essential skills needed to be successful on the job,” said SNHWC wellness resource coordinator Jenn Bandi. “Our clients love the opportunity to interact with the students and learn about their field of study and future aspirations.

“In turn, our clients get the most current information in the field and practical strategies to manage their health.”

Niagara College’s Paramedic program is a two-year diploma program based at its Welland Campus. For information visit niagaracollege.ca/alliedhealth/program/paramedic/.

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

-30-

Media inquiries, please contact:

 

Julie Greco

Communications Consultant

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368

Cell: 905 328 2532

jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

 

Michael Wales

Communications Manager

Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7773

Cell: 905 328 4101

mwales@niagaracollege.ca

License to Brew: NC students infuse ‘killer flavours’ at Project Brew this holiday season

On Friday, December 6, student brewers from Niagara College’s Brewmaster and Brewery Operations Management program will serve up their top-secret recipes – unique beers infused with ‘killer flavours’ at Project Brew: License to Brew.

Nineteen student brewers will be at Market Square in St. Catharines for the College’s celebrated student-run craft beer festival. The event, held each semester, features highly innovative and thirst-quenching beers crafted by NC students, and is a chance for beer lovers in the community to sample their small-batch creations.

“This term’s graduating class has learned the complexities of planning a beer festival,” said April Tyrrell, faculty advisor for the event. “They developed their event-planning skills through the hands-on application of marketing the event, creating a sponsorship package, designing the floor plan and décor. The execution of the event will bring everything together at Market Square.”

Student brewer Nate Byrnes recognizes the irony in the event’s theme; James Bond’s drink of choice was a martini, not a beer.

“We’re putting a spin on the Casino Royale theme. One of the class beers we’re producing is a gin-inspired beer in honour of Bond,” said Byrnes. “We like the James Bond that drinks beer.”

This winter, students will be previewing a variety of styles and flavours, from fruity sours to a darker coffee maple stout, berry porter, and chai-spiced brown ale, among others.

“The beers being produced are our own creations from start to finish,” said Byrnes, who noted the breadth of hands-on experience students are exposed to in preparation for Project Brew will prepare them for their careers as brewers and business owners.

Largest female brewing class in program history

The event is hosted by students in their fourth and final term of the Brewmaster program which includes eight female students – representing the largest number of women in a NC Brewmaster class to date.

“The students in this class have been amazing. The dedication they have shown to learning their craft, taking part in industry events and how they have come together as a team in the brewery shows that diversity really benefits everyone,” said NC brewmaster professor Jon Downing who has been with the program since its inception. “It is going to be fun to see how they grow and become a part of the brewing community. The craft brewing industry is constantly changing and improving. I know they will each be a huge asset no matter where they end up or what they do.”

Brewmaster-in-training Laura Milukow returned to her home province of Ontario in 2018, joining the program after six years working in forestry in western Canada. Her brew, Golden Spruce, has a personal touch; a double dry hopped mango IPA with juniper and spruce tips – a tribute to her time spent tree planting.

“I planted over half a million spruce trees out west, so it was a really important ingredient to me,” said Milukow, who is an environmentalist at heart. Milukow describes the flavour as “woody, refreshing and seasonal.”

“I’m inspired by seeing other women in the industry, and having so many female brewers in the class definitely gave it a different dynamic. We were all excited to brew together,” she said.

Milukow hopes to be part of the movement of more women and diversity represented in the craft brewing industry. “When I tell people I’m brewing, they assume I’m making wine. No, I’m making beer,” she said proudly.

“The fact that there are eight of us in this class, it seems like it’s looking up,” said Milukow. “The women in this class are going to be among my closest resources once I hit the industry.”

“We’re proud to have strong female representation in this class and hope to see women’s interest in brewing grow in the years to come,” said Tyrrell. “The students have learned how events like Project Brew can be an inclusive space for all people. Our female graduates are creating their own inclusive spaces as they boldly head into the craft beer industry.”

Proceeds from Project Brew support the Matt Soos Memorial Fund, which awards a scholarship each year to the student who brews the best beer at the College’s Brewmaster Competition.

Meet the brewers, get a sneak peek at the brews, order tickets and find more details at niagaracollege.ca/projectbrew.

Niagara College offers more than 130 diploma, bachelor degree and advanced level programs; as well as more than 600 credit, vocational and general interest Part-Time Studies courses. Areas of specialization include food and wine sciences, advanced technology, media, applied health and community safety, supported by unique learning enterprises in food, wine, beer, distilling, horticulture and esthetics. For more information visit niagaracollege.ca.

-30-

 

Media inquiries, please contact:

 

Julie Greco
Communications Consultant
Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7368
Cell: 905 328 2532
jgreco@niagaracollege.ca

Michael Wales
Communications Manager
Office: 905 641-2252 ext. 7773
Cell: 905 328 4101
mwales@niagaracollege.ca